Divas and Diversity

On All Hallows’ Eve Eve (that is, 30th October), I had the great fortune of being invited to the Australian Human Resources Institute’s Diversity Awards Dinner because my organisation had been nominated for two awards.  It was even more fortunate that the dinner was held in Melbourne.
I flew to southward, mid afternoon, indulging in A Winter’s Tale as my in-flight entertainment, my love of Lady Sybill overshadowing my slight and unfounded distrust of Colin Farrell.
I stayed at the Grand Hyatt, which has absolutely opulent decor and, interestingly, a salacious reputation as the location from which a particular Labor MP allegedly organised rendezvous with a number of call girls.
But I’m not going to hold that against it, especially given that the bathroom was so posh it was made of black marble and had sketches of (what I can only imagine to be) French prostitutes bathing.
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See below the mademoiselle undertaking her toilette in the background of my embarrassingly narcissistic bathroom selfie.  (Obviously taken for the purpose of checking my makeup still looked fine when not mirrored…)
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I was also really impressed by the couch/booth that served both as a location to recline and eat (without spilling the food all over yourself which inevitably happens to me when I don’t have a table in front of me).
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But I didn’t have much time to enjoy the room, because I was determined to take the opportunity of being in Melbourne to make an express visit to one of my very favourite European shops H&M (I think this might make me “basic”, but I’m yet to have a spiced pumpkin latte or re-tweet #tay4hottest100 so I think I’m still safe enough).  H&M had only been in Melbourne for a few months, but I was surprised that I remembered the location, where there is a sculpture of a giant clam shell.
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Here’s me and Kimmi in front of the then future home of H&M, in 2008…DSC08027
In about half an hour and for less than $100, I bought 3 work-appropriate lace blouses, a singlet dress, a woven cardigan and a pair denim shorts that are actually an appropriate length for someone who likes to keep her bottom to herself.
Then, it was time for the big event!  I took some photos of myself in my room before going down.  Some weren’t timed very well.
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I was a little in awe of the company I was keeping – the who’s who of senior management in my business!  For example, I took some photos in the lobby with the VP of HR, as one does…  I felt a little bit like Colin Creevy hanging out with Harry Potter.
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The event was beautifully put together.  We were treated to a moving performance of Let it Be by the Melbourne Gay and Lesbian Chorus and the compare was entertaining for the majority of the time (with the exception of his impression of the recently deceased Gough Whitlam).  And the food was excellent (with the exception of the portion of pistachio ice cream that ended up on my dress.)
We were nominated for two awards – Gender Equity in the Workplace and the AHRI Diversity Champion Award (recognising CEOs who champion the cause).  You’ll notice that I say “we” very loosely given that the first nomination was the result of the very dedicated efforts of our Diversity team and the second can really only be claimed by our CEO himself.
We had a 100% success rate with our nominations, winning two out of two awards!  The first was accepted by the VP of HR and the second, not surprisingly by our CEO:
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The rest of the night was spent celebrating and posing for photos:
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The next morning, we visited some of our intermodal operations at Altona and Dynon.
I’ll fast forward over the rail/truck tour details for those of you without a train fetish and on to something that I think we would all find interesting… lunch!
I met up with the Chair of the Institute of Railway Engineers Australia Younger Members’ Committee for lunch at Chin Chin.
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We perched ourselves on one of the few remaining seats on the bar and proceeded to be overwhelmed by the menu.  In the end, the waiter had to help us choose the following:
King fish sashimi with lime chilli coconut and thai basil
Wok fried salt and pepper squid with nudc cham and vietnamese mint
Crispy barramundi and green apple salad with caramelised pork, chilli and lemongrass
They were all wonderful, but the baramundi and pork was my favourite.  I can still remember the delightful sour tang that puckered my mouth as if I were taking a duck face selfie.  I’m now salivating like Pavlov’s dog…
I flew home in the afternoon after partaking in the delights of the Melbourne Velocity Lounge, which has a priority security gate.  What luxury!
I spent the flight trying not to cry while watching The Book Thief.  What a great film!  I would have been a bawling mess if I had not suppressed my feelings like a McDonald’s employee compressing trash.
I was met at the airport by Davey, and Kimmi and Damo who had come to spend the weekend after a conference Kimmi attended during the day on Friday.
We went into the city for some Friday night shopping… well some of us shopped and some of us visited the pub.  I think you can guess who went where, especially considering that Kimmi is expecting a little Bailliewood (and she’s a responsible, dedicated mum-to-be).
Kimmi and I went on the hunt for maternity wear.  Unfortunately, the Queen Street Mall was a bit lacking in this department, aside from Jeans West, which has a surprisingly great range, but we did see some very cute baby clothes anyway.  I also managed to get a little bit of christmas shopping done so the excursion was not entirely wasted.
We met the boys for dinner at Vapianos.  If you are yet to have to pleasure of dining at Vapianos, I’ll give you a quick induction.  You get an electronic card that gets swiped at different stations where chefs are cooking food in front of you.  Then at the end, you pay for whatever’s been swiped on your card.  It’s a bit like having a self-serve tab.  It’s also a wonderful place for stuffing yourself full of pizza and pasta, as we did.
We rolled home for a good sleep.  I really had been a long day for me, as it often is when you wake up in a different time zone.
In the morning, after failing to have breakfast at South Side Diner, we drove to Gasworks to dine at Buzz, one of the rare places one can find savoury mince for breakfast.  Kimmi and Damo seemed happy with their breakfasts, even if they didn’t have savoury mince.
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We took Kimmi to a maternity wear shop in the Grange.  The clothes were beautiful and cut perfectly under the bust, just the way I like.  Such a shame they were maternity wear!  Kimmi picked up some great pieces.
Then we had an excursion to Ikea to look at potential baby furniture.  Damo tried out some very comfy chairs and Davey tried, once again, to convince me to get a cow hide.
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In the evening, we cooked an amazing lamb roast on the webber and finished off the evening with some low fat orange muffins.
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On Sunday morning, we walked across the bridge to the botanic gardens, stopping briefly for a photo.
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We had some breakfast at a cafe in the gardens and had made a little friend.
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We returned to the mall for a little more shopping while Davey argued with Telstra and then descended into the cool darkness of O’Malley’s for a steak lunch special.
On our way home, we walked through the parklands, which were helpfully labelled, incase we forgot what city we were in.
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It was truly a bittersweet experience to stop in to T-Licious for a Devonshire tea this time because they were closing in a few days, and it would be our last scone there.
Time had certainly run out.
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After a short power nap, we dropped Kimmi and Damo at the airport and said goodbye, or at least “au reviour”, until Christmas!
I thought it might have been a good opportunity to stay in Melbourne leading up to the Melbourne Cup but it was really lovely to see Kimmi and Damo, and I always think I’m going to enjoy the races but it’s never as romantic as in My Fair Lady.  And also, so I didn’t feel too left out, I just wore my fascinator to work on Tuesday, because I could.  A win all round!
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historic walking tour

This seemed the perfect comic reblog to follow my own historic walking tour…

Wrong Hands

historic walking tour

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Walk Like a Novacastrian

This post follows on from this one.

This was my twelfth visit to Newcastle.  (And I have subsequently made a thirteenth.)  I have visited Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Pisa, Venice, Verona, Florence, Dublin, and Frankfurt only once each but because I was in the holiday frame of mind every time, I explored these cities properly, visiting their historic and cultural hot spots rather than consuming sale items and soft serves at the nearest Westfield.  For example, looking back at my photos, I have 8 photos of Verona (and I was much more controlled in my photo taking back in 2006.  It was pre-instagram so I didn’t even have a photo of my lunch!) and I spent 2 hours there.  That’s 1 photo every 15 minutes; some proper touristing.

Where my wandering statistics are trying to lead are to the realisation that Newcastle was a city with a story which I had ignored for long enough.  It was time to finally explore the city with eyes anew!

I started the day, as I usually do in Newcastle, being so indecisive about breakfast, that I have a toast medley of ever increasing decadence – vegemite, peanut butter, marmalade and nutella.

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I had found a self-guided tour online and convinced my uncle to tag along.  Due to parking convenience, we started our tour off the recommended path, at the Nobby’s Beach Surf Pavilion, where I took the quintessential photo of the lighthouse under the arch, at my uncle’s recommendation and a few more for good measure.

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Now that I reflect back upon this walk, it seems that we were very liberal with the “self-guided” part of our walk.  Our second location, Fort Scratchly was also not listed on the walk but it was only a short walk up a hill from Nobby’s Beach so it seemed worth it.  Especially since the view while walking up the incline was nothing to complain about and actually allowed us to tick off one of the future stops, Stop 7, the estuarine foreshore, the custodians of which are the Awabakal people.

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Stop 7

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(Apparently, the apartments in the second photo of the last group of three are actually council housing.  Uncle Jim explain that they are a source of much controversy due to their stunning harbour and sea views.)

Fort Scratchely (the fort formerly known as Braithwaite’s Head) was the site of Australia’s first coal mine, manned by convicts from 1801.  From 1828, the site’s purpose was changed from mining to military, transitioning through a couple of names, Fort Battlesticks, Flagstaff Hill and Signal Hill, before becoming the Fort Scratchley of today (or to be more correct, the Fort Scratchely of yesterday, considering that it no longer an official military base).

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One of the side effects of having a position that provides excellent vision of approaching war ships is that when the war ships aren’t a threat anymore, you end up with excellent views of the surrounds.

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Also, there was an anchor out the front…IMG_1193

Try as we might, without looking too suspicious in a residential street, we were unable to locate the official Newcastle Heritage sign for our first official stop on our walk, Parnell Place.  With the absence of the sign and its information, I am unsure of the exact historical significance of Parnell Place, but the houses were very advanced in age, in some sort of “Tudor Revival” style, and if that’s not enough to get you a heritage listing, I don’t know what is!

Stop 9: Parnell Place

Stop 9: Parnell Place

The was a memorial to coal, presumably with a block of coal atop it, with some very intricate copper friezes depicting scenes from the “life” of coal in the Hunter.

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I was getting a bit disgruntled by the time I found the sign for Stop 10 – it was quite warm in the sunshine and I had made the mistakes of wearing a long-sleeved t-shirt and a felt hat, and, uncharacteristically, going outside during the day. Newcastle Heritage and I differ in our interpretations of what is a site of interest and what is not.  Stop 10 was the site of the former gaol, but there was nothing left of it and pine trees had grown over the area.  However, I was willing to forgive Newcastle Heritage because at least reading the sign was quite informative.  It mentioned both mining and trams (two things high on the list of “Infrastructure That I Like”) and they spelt “gaol” correctly, appealing to my inner Grammarian.

Stop 10: The Old Gaol Site

Stop 10: The Old Gaol Site

We walked in the direction of the ocean, as guided by the map and arrived at Stop 11, the Newcastle Ocean Baths, an Edwardian era project which was completed with a fantastic Art Deco facade in the 30s.

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

The last time I was here, it was much gloomier.  As much as I romanticise stormy weather, it was nice to see the gorgeous art deco colours to full advantage in the sunlight.

While I was polite enough not to take photos of ocean bathers in the official area of the baths, I couldn’t resist photographing these seagulls during their ocean bathing.  This location reminded me of Mrs Bennet’s praise of the salt water swim. “A little sea-bathing would set me up for ever,” she proclaims in Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 41!Stop 11: Newcastle Ocean Baths

Further around the headland, we found Stop 12, Newcastle Beach. and a few more avian friends enjoying the sunshine and sea air.

Stop 13: Newcastle Beach

Stop 12: Newcastle Beach

Stop 13: Newcastle Beach

Stop 12: Newcastle Beach

Stop 13: Newcastle Beach

Stop 12: Newcastle Beach

Stop 13: Newcastle Beach

Stop 12: Newcastle Beach

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Just as I had re-gained my faith in the quality and actual existence of stops on the Historic Walk, I was confronted with Stop 13, Former Shortland Park.  This location was once described as having “resplendent gardens” but was now a patch of sandy grass punctuated by a concrete tunnel.

Stop 13: Former Shortland Park

Stop 13: Former Shortland Park

As we walked through the grafiti-adorned tunnel, which was a welcome respite from the sun, we arrived at Stop 14, Pacific Park, which, happily, was still a park full of soft, green grass and the kind of imposing but familiar trees that one would want to read a book under.   Apparently, a tram line used to traverse Pacific Park and I’m still not sure which way I would have preferred it…  The absence of trams does increase the serenity of the park but, on the other hand, I do love light rail!
Stop 14: Pacific Park

Stop 14: Pacific Park

Stop 14: Pacific Park

Stop 14: Pacific Park

Pacific Park is overlooked by Tyrell House from the North East, a beautiful old brick building built in 1921, and Stop 15, the Royal Newcastle Hospital, from the South.  I had actually visited the old Hospital the previous day, because my Aunt’s hairdresser is installed on the ground floor of the new apartment building occupying the Hospital’s facade.
Tyrell House

Tyrell House

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Stop 15: Royal Newcastle Hospital

Stop 15: Royal Newcastle Hospital

Being raised in a location with an abundance of coastline but a deficit of historical architecture, I will generally be more impressed with something manmade of sandstone than something gradually crafted by the sands of time (like a beach).  Knowing this about me, my uncle led us through an alternative route to Stop 16 down Watt Street, which passed by an angular red brick church and a row of gorgeous, candy-coloured terrace houses.  I can be sure that my classification of these buildings as terrace houses was correct because one was actually named “The Terrace”.  It turned out that Watt Street was actually Stop 17 so we had actually taken a short cut.
Stop 17: Watt Street

Stop 17: Watt Street

Stop 17: Watt Street

Stop 17: Watt Street

"The Terrace"

“The Terrace”

But back to Stop 16…  Stop 16, Fletcher Park, was one of the high points of my journey, literally and figuratively, being perched on top of a hill with an endless view of the sky.  The park is named after James Fletcher, whose statute also occupies the park.  Mr Fletcher is described as “a friend of the miners” which is definitely something we share – just look at the occupation of all my Linked In connections!  Mr Fletcher’s statue faces inwards, away from the sea, which means that he can see the obelisk on the neighbouring hill to great advantage.
Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

Stop 16: Fletcher Park

The Obelisk

The Obelisk

Due to our unwittingly jumping the gun and seeing Stop 17 before Stop 16, we took the opportunity to walk down Bolton Street on our way from Fletcher Park to Stop 18 and passed the old court house and some more terrace houses.  One of the houses was of particular significance to my uncle, because it was formerly the residence of some of his relatives.  We checked the nameplate, and unfortunately, none of their descendants remain in the building.

Court House

Court House

The tenants now occupying the house of Uncle Jim's relatives

The tenants now occupying the former house of Uncle Jim’s relatives

Terrace Houses on Bolton Street

Terrace Houses on Bolton Street

 We walked towards the Hunter Street intersection, past the post office and T&G tower, which looks exactly like the one that was demolished in Townsville towards Uncle Jim’s favourite historic building of the area, the home of the Longworth Institute.
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Post Office

Post Office

Post Office

T&G Building

T&G Building

Longworth Institute

Longworth Institute

Longworth Institute

Longworth Institute

And then we came to the last stop on the walk (if we had started from the beginning), Stop 18, the Newcastle Railway Station!

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As we were already close to where we had dropped Aunty Wilma that morning, and it was also close to lunch time, we went to the gallery to invite her to have lunch with us.
We found Aunty Wilma giving a detailed explanation of her work to fans so I had a little wander through The Lock-up, the gallery next door which is, unsurprisingly, a former lock-up.
The Lock-up

The Lock-up

The Lock-up

The Lock-up

I’m not really that in tune with the supernatural world.  I’ve never seen a ghost or at least I’ve never had a ghost be able to distract me enough from the things I’ve got going on in my own bubble to make its presence obvious to me.  That said, I certainly felt a sense of unease approaching the padded cell in The Lock-up so much so that I couldn’t make myself go in. It was pretty creepy.  The photo doesn’t really do it justice.  It was actually much darker than that but my lovely camera knew to expose it a little longer to get a decent photo.

The Lock-up

The Lock-up

Aunty Wilma was keen for lunch so we headed towards Stop 3, Customs House, which, like all Customs Houses I’ve ever encountered had been converted to a charming restaurant, although the service was a little slow at the start of our experience.

Customs House

Customs House

Customs House

Customs House

Customs House

Customs House

After lunch, on our way back to the car, we walked past Stop 5, the former rail marshalling yards which has some interesting sculptures and is overlooked by some lovely historic homes.

Stop 5

Stop 5

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I returned to the car with a full belly, brain and camera.  Although I do like a good grumble about things like passing former historic site off as actual historic sites, inconvenient waitresses and the oppressive heat for which I was unprepared, I did have a lovely day out attempting to follow the Newcastle East Historic Walk.  I’ve made a graphic showing exactly where I went compared with where I was supposed to go.

Where I actually Went on my Newcastle walk

In the evening, my cousins, cousins-in-law and second cousins came over for dinner.  We celebrated my Aunt’s gallery opening by cracking open the bottles of pink champagne that my parents had sent.

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Pikachu also had a sneaky celebratory vino and canapé…  Cheers!

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The next day, being touristed out from my walk, Kel, my cousin’s wife, and I spent the morning being decadently suburban by having a coffee and a pedicure at the Maitland shopping centre.  Both of us lacked the foresight to actually wear thongs but we were taken care of with some pink disposable monstrosities.

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We had a delicious lunch at my cousins’ place, rounded off with a cup of Stockholm Black, which Aunty Wilma had given me as a thank you for speaking at her gallery opening.

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What a lovely (and thematically appropriate) ending to my Newcastle leave of distinction!

2014 in review

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A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 500 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 8 trips to carry that many people.

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